Guilders Weave    

GUILDERS WEAVE - Teachers Bio's

Want to find out a little about your teacher for this year's Guilders Weave? Below are all the Guilders Weave teachers; click on your favorite teacher's name and read a little bit about them.

Peggy Adelman
Greg Barco
Jan Beyma
Anne Bowers
Jane McCall Brinkman
Jenny Elzy
Pati English

Jean Polthress Koon Karen Kotecki
Eileen LaPorte
Jennifer Lee
Rami McKinney
Becki Newsome
Billy Owens

Judith Saunders
Joyce Smith
Pam Talsky
Sandy Whalen
Pamela Wilson
Judy Wobbleton
Pamela Zimmerman


 

Peggy Adelman
Greesnboro, North Carolina

My name is Peggy Adelman. My basket career started 19 years ago when we first moved to North Carolina. I took a basket making class at Guilford Technical Community College. From there I joined the North Carolina Basket Makers Association and have taken many classes and workshops from different teachers. In 2009, I became the basket making instructor at GTCC. The last 4 years I have taught my original designs at national basket making conventions. As you can tell, I love weaving baskets and helping others learn the craft. I currently live in Greensboro, North Carolina with my husband and our 4 dogs. When I am not weaving I advocate for children in the foster care system. It is rewarding work as is weaving and teaching. My basket web site is Bluemoonbaskets.com


Greg Barco
Shawboro, North Carolina


Lifetime farmer, woodworker and stool weaver, Greg Barco, has been only teaching the weaving of seagrass stools for 5 years but he has been making them for 37 years. He is a member of the Albemarle Craftsmans Guild. He also does work with chair caning, rush cord caning and flat reed.

Jan Beyma
Wilmington, North Carolina


I have been teaching and weaving baskets for over 20 years. I have taught at NCBA, GA, KY, PA and TBA conventions, seminars and for our local Port City Guild. I enjoy weaving Nantucket baskets. I love to stimulate the interest of basket weaving and sharing weaving tips with others that I've learned over the years, while also learning new tips from my students. I consider myself a non-traditional Nantucket weaver as I find common things to use as molds for my classes. I usually will incorporate a twill weave of some kind into my baskets. I have served on the NCBA board as membership chair and member at large over the years.


Anne Bowers
Kearneysville, West Virginia


Anne is from the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia where she works in her studio designing and teaching baskets. She was a production basket maker for many years and brings those skills into each basket that she teaches. Ribbed basketry is her specialty, and some of her baskets have taken on a sculptural perspective in recent years. Anne has participated in many basketry exhibits. Anne has received many awards including one from Tamarack for outstanding skills in basketry. She is a member of the National Basketry Organization. She has taught on three basket cruises, teaches basketry widely and also lectures about the woven form. She is in her 36th year of weaving and is still fascinated with the woven form. She recently participated in her 28th year of Jefferson County, WV’s annual Over the Mountain Studio Tour. Her goal is to make each students class a successful one.


Jane McCall Brinkman
Meadowview, Virginia


I live near Damascus, Virginia, in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. I am a member of TBG, NCBA, and TSBG. I have been teaching for 15 years; teaching at GW, locally, and thru the Holston Mountain Artisans Co-op in Abingdon, Va. My best times are spent with all the Basket Cases I weave with wherever I go!

Jenny Elzy
Atlantic Beach, North Carolina


I have been weaving for over 25 years, attending my first NCBA convention in 1994. I have enjoyed learning from many different teachers and have tried to share that with others. I enjoy teaching groups of all ages as well as teaching at local guild meetings. NCBA seminar 2016 was my first year teaching for NCBA. Over the years, my baskets have won awards at county fairs, Carteret County Art from the Heart, and are being displayed in a local gallery and gift shop.

Pati English
Seneca, South Carolina


As a Basket Maker/Instructor, Pati shares her love of basketry, weaving experience, and basket skills while teaching weavers of all ages in her studio, schools, museums, guilds, conventions, and the John C. Campbell Folk School. She creates baskets often with Native American influence, and continues to experiment with round reed variations. Materials hand dyed in her studio are incorporated in original designs and class kits. Patterns available from national suppliers and her website, www.BasketsMySpecialty.com. A South Carolina Art Commission Resident Artist, Pati is the author of Award-Winning Basket Designs; Techniques and Patterns For All Levels, with 349 color photographs, 15 award-winning patterns, and lots more.


Jean Poythress Koon
Morattico, Virginia


Jean began making baskets when she retired from a career as a culinary arts teacher. She has taught classes all over the country including John C. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC, North House Folk School, Minnesota, and Porcupine Mountain Folk School, Ontonagen, Michigan. Her work has been featured in National juried shows and publication, including Fiber Arts Now and Shuttle Spindle and Dyepot.


Karen Kotecki
Dousman, Wisconsin


Karen's license plate holder says it all: "I'd Rather Be Basket Weaving". She creates her designs incorporating reed, wood, barks, and cane. Weaving with her hand-painted paper is her current passion; expanding her exploration of design and color. The opportunity to share her knowledge and be inspired by the work of others drives Karen's desire to teach.


Eileen LaPorte
Washinton, Michigan


I began weaving over 30 years ago taking many basket classes from some great teachers along the way who have become very close friends. I went on to teach basketry at a local shop, guilds and state conventions. Over the years basketry has taken me to England, Germany, New Zeland and Australia a few times. I love sharing what I have learned about baskets to students. I am still learning from my students. I will never be too old to learn. Always more baskets to be made.


Jennifer Lee
Plainfield, Massachusetts


I have been making bark baskets and teaching the art for 37 years because I find the process so enjoyable. Joy describes the feeling of taking only bark, roots and branches and making something stong and usable in the tradition of my Native ancestors. Happy is how people get when I bring the bark, root and branches, for them to fashion something beautiful as well as durable. Historic accounts of ash, oak, pine, spruce, elm, chestnut and birch bark being used to cover the wigwams encouraged me to try ash and white pine bark from trees that shaded my garden and needed to be taken down. The trees make a way for me to share, celebrate, express, participate and contribute. All materials are wild harvested by the teacher except the hemp cord for straps.


Rami McKinney
Norfolk, Virginia


I have been weaving for over 18 years, teaching in varies states, doing juried art shows, craft shows & demonstrating & selling my baskets at historical sites for most of 15 years. I was the basket maker at Middleton Plantation, SC & Hancock Shaker Site, MA when we were stationed in those areas. Rib baskets are my favorite to weave. I really enjoy trying different fibers for a more contemporary look.

Becki Newsome
Swansboro, North Carolina


Becky has been weaving since 1992; learning how to weave in the garage of a co-worker. She is a member of Coastal Weavers from Swansboro, NC. Becky began teaching friends in 1995 and then taught at weave-ins with her guild. She has taught at NCBA, Guilders Weave in VA, Jabez, KY and for guilds in WVA and VA. Becky has taught girl scout troops, children in her classroom and more recently 4-H. She feels that it is most important to share basket weaving with the younger generations so the art does not die with the current generation.

Billy Owens
Aurora, Missouri


Billy Owens is the second generation of the “Owens’” White Oak basket makers. His dad, Dale Owens, was self-taught and the first basket maker in the family. His wife Theresa helps with the weaving, as well as the children and grandchildren (the third and fourth generation). “Owens Oak Baskets”, has been around for over 30 years in the Ozarks of Southwestern Missouri. All the material used in their baskets is made from White Oak timber grown here in the Ozarks, which Billy selects, cuts and prepares by hand using a homemade hand tool which was made by his Dad called a "Split Knife". Billy has taught at conventions and workshops all over the United States. In his classes he enjoys sharing with his students everything about the Ozark and Owens method of "White Oak" basketry, from selecting the right tree to how he prepares the material for weaving. It is his goal when he teaches, that first and foremost everyone leaves with a finished basket that will last a lifetime and they can be proud of, as well as have a fun time learning about the process of White Oak basket making. He wants to ensure the Tradition of Ozark White Oak basketry lives on. billy.owens@ymail.com / www.OwensOakBaskets.com



Judith Saunders
Norfolk, Virginia


While traditional basketry techniques are used in Judith's art pieces, the results are far from traditional. Her vessels are intended to be more sculptural than functional. Judith Saunders has been weaving three-dimensional forms with copper and hand-painted papers for more than thirty years. Her plaited forms can be seen in the book Plaited Basketry with Birch Bark by Vladimir Yarish, Flo Hoppe and Jim Widess. Judith's second home on Ocracoke Island, NC provides the inspiration for her more organic pieces, the "Shell Basket" series, that always starts with an Ocracoke shell each providing a new design challenge.




Joyce Smith
Kingsport, Tennessee


Joyce has been weaving and teaching for over 27 years. She is one of the founding members of the Tidewater Basketry Guild. She studied with Martha Wetherbee for many summers and has studied the shakers and their communities for many years. She also studied with Jesse Butcher (a legend in Tennessee) and Tom and Connie McColley for the white oak baskets.



Pam Talsky
Waterford, WI


It started with a pine needle basket in June of 1994. Pam has since traveled to Thailand with the Royalwood tour and has made 13 trips to Alaska since 1998, to learn Pine Needle Basketry from Jeannie McFarland and Native Haida weaving with Delores Churchill. She also goes to harvest and prepare her own western red and Alaskan yellow cedar barks and Sitka spruce root. She loves everything about weaving, from the gathering and preparation of materials to creating beautiful, mostly functional vessels. The connection of weaving across the cultures continues to amaze and inspire her. Sharing her knowledge and continuing to learn from other weavers brings her great joy. Pam has earned many awards, among them; the AMB Best Coiled for General Membership in 2003. In 2004 she won the Teachers awards for both Coiled and Naturals, for Coiled in 2005, for both Coiled and Art Piece in 2006, she won the AMB best coiled Teacher in 2009 and, most recently, the AMB Coveted Viewer’s Choice Award in 2010. 3 first place awards at the NCBA convention 2013. In 2001 she donated 3 weeks and over 200 hours of time to weave a family of willow Tepees for the Ronald McDonald house, which are still used by the kids today. Pam teaches around the country at conventions in Texas, North Carolina, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Alaska, Michigan, Georgia, Minnesota, Tennessee, Virginia, Ohio and Wisconsin, to name a few. She also teaches in her private studio in Waterford when she is not on the road. Pam completed three baskets for the Hoard Museum of Fort Atkinson, which are permanently displayed in their Mystery of the Mounds Exhibit, opened April 2009. Pam traveled to Dharmashala, India for 2 ½ weeks in November of 2010 to teach the local women pine needle basketry so that they may have an industry to earn a living and make use of their long leaf Cher pine needles. Her work has been featured and on the cover of the Wisconsin People & Ideas Magazine. Vol56/NO 4 2010, the National Basketry Organization’s Quarterly Review Summer 2015 as well as in Fiber Art Now in 2015. Her work has been on exhibit at the Phillip Dickel Museum in Amana, Iowa as well as the National Basketry Organization’s ‘All Things Considered’. pamtalsky@wi.rr.com/ www.pamtalsky.com



Sandy Whalen
Milford, Michigan


Although her first basket class was years ago, in college as a part of her Occupational Therapy studies, the real beginnings stemmed from teaching various chair weaving classes in the adult education system. It didn’t take long for Sandy to discover willow and start growing it on her farm in Michigan. Willow is easy to grow and you can harvest your own weaving material. She loves the strength and character of w1llow and the lovely, sturdy baskets that are created. Over the years she has received several 1st place awards at the AMB conventions. In her quest for willow knowledge, Sandy has traveled to England, Germany, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand.



Pamela Wilson
Denville, New Jersey


Pamela loves all styles of basket making and finds great satisfaction in creating beautiful works, and in sharing her love of basket making with other weavers. Her work is exhibitied at Peter's Valley in Layton, NJ. She has taught extensively at her local adult education school and for a number of basketry guilds including Central Pennsylvania Basket Weavers Guild, Deer Creek Basket Guild, High Country Guild and Penn-Jersey Basket Weavers Guild and for Peters's Valley and the Country Seat, a basketry supply store. She is a long time member of the National Basketry Organization and Central PA Basket Weavers Guild. She holds a BFA from the University of Oklahoma and a MFA from Florida State University.


Judy Wobbleton
Williamston, NC


Basketry artist, Judy Wobbleton, has been creatively weaving baskets for over 30 years. She uses traditional techniques to create functional pieces influenced by Native American and traditional Appalachian designs. She is also cofounder of NCBA, currently serving as Treasurer and has held previous board position as President, Convention Coordinator 1986, 2005 & 2012, CRC Chair, Membership Chair and Treasurer. Judy’s work has been featured in several publications including NC Our State magazine, The Basket Book, Basketmaker’s Baskets, Craft Works in the Home, A Basketmaker’s Odyssey, Over, Under, Around and Through and The Ultimate Basket Book. In addition to weaving Judy serves as Chair of the Martin County Arts Council of NC.



Pamela Zimmerman
Washington, NC


Pamela has won over 500 awards for her contemporary weavings and horsehair miniatures. Her woven jewerly has been featured in national magazines, such as Belle Armoire Jewerly, multiple times. Pamela is co-founder of the Natural Fibers Group, served continuously on the NCBA board from 2002-2018, twice as convention coordinator. She is the founder/webmaster of the internet-based Pine Needle Group. Pamela has been a National Basketry Organization Guild Ambassador, and teaches basketry through the Road Scholar Program.

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